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Surf Clams

Goody Hallet:  Nolan’s dream made real

PROVINCETOWN, MA – Large, new-to-the-area fishing vessels are seldom seen around any port on Cape Cod these days.  So, the arrival of Scott and Max Nolan’s 80′ Goody Hallet at the town dock in Provincetown earlier this year was big news on the waterfront.

The 80'x22'x12' Goody Hallet outfitted as a clam boat. (Steven Kennedy photo)

The 80′x22′x12′
Goody Hallet outfitted as a clam boat.
(Steven Kennedy photo)

The father and son duo have created what is probably the Cape’s first large-scale, Jersey-rigged clammer to fish the waters around Cape Cod and the Islands.  The Nolans were challenged in many ways to make their dream a reality but persevered and made it happen.

Scott Nolan made his living fishing for many years, first out of Wellfleet, then from New Bedford, surf clamming and scalloping on multiple boats until finally ending up in the wheelhouse of a 90′ steel scalloper…

 

Cape Cod Fisheries Trust helps to revitalize day-boat surf clam fishery

CHATHAM, MA – The Cape Cod Fisheries Trust was granted an exempted fishing permit (EFP) in mid-August that allows local fishermen to experiment with smaller-sized surf clam landing containers.

The Atlantic surf clam fishery originated on Cape Cod in the 1870s, but after the fishery transitioned to individual transferable quota management in 1990, available quota consolidated onto a handful of directed surf clam boats that were largely based in the Mid-Atlantic.  According to the trust, no federal quota has been owned on Cape Cod as of 2000.

That changed in 2012, however, when the trust bought 31,136 bushels of available quota to lease to local fishermen at affordable, subsidized prices…

 

Sea Watch expands sea clam plant in New Bedford

NEW BEDFORD, MA – Twenty years ago, when climate change was just beginning to be debated, Sea Watch International Inc. recognized that something was making temperature-sensitive Atlantic surf clams and ocean quahogs move northward and into deeper waters.  So, Sea Watch decided to expand its business to better follow the clams.

“The Palace,” Sea Watch’s new state-of-the-art processing area, which is based on the latest advance in food processing called “sanitation by design.” (Joyce Rowley photo)

“The Palace,” Sea Watch’s new state-of-the-art processing area, which is based on the latest advance in food processing called “sanitation by design.”
(Joyce Rowley photo)

In 1994, the company acquired a 50,000-square-foot facility on 4.75 acres on New Bedford’s Acushnet River and began processing.  The location, which is near major transportation routes and has ample dockage to handle the company’s 121′ Sea Watcher I coming in from offshore Southern New England clam beds, was ideal.

From its start as a clam cannery in Milford, DE in 1978, Sea Watch has since grown to become the nation’s largest supplier of name brand clam products.  A merger of the Sea Watch management team with the clam fishing and processing firm Truex, Meyers, Truex in 1999 allowed the company to secure a guaranteed, quality product and provide a stable market supply…

 

Read the rest and much, much more in the October issue of Commercial Fisheries News. Read online

immediately and download for future reference.

 

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